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Archives for: September 2017

Love Compatibility Among the Chinese Animal Signs – Year of the Monkey

According to the Chinese Astrologists, the characteristics of an individual can be determined from the year, month, time and place of birth. The reality of such prediction is about 60% accurate since one can change ones character and attitude either for better or worse as the years go by. The environment and our determination can also affect those characteristics.

Sincere, kind and truthful attitudes are valuable for establishing good friendships whereas arrogance and flattering approaches are to be discouraged.

The following information could help you to know about your relationship as well as compatibility with other signs. More importantly, one should always realize personal shortfalls and learn from the positive attitudes of others.

COMPATIBILITY TABLE FOR THE MONKEY

A Monkey person is born in the following years: 1908, 1920, 1932, 1944, 1956, 1968, 1980, 1992, 2004, 2016 and 2028

The Monkey is the sign of the inventor, the improviser and the motivator in the Chinese zodiac; a charlatan capable of drawing everyone to him with his inimitable guile and charm. Being the quick-witted genius of the cycle, he is clever, flexible and innovative. A person born in this sign will be successful at whatever he chooses to do. No challenge will be too great for him.

RAT – Very compatible together. Highly successful union. Have deep and strong affinity for one another. Will find love and contentment.

OX – Have mutual reservations about each other. No deep or lasting ties. Communication barriers. Moderately good relations at best.

TIGER – Strong clashes and rivalry. Will not comprehend each other. Mutually suspicious. No areas of common interests. Highly incompatible.

RABBIT – Some petty differences and rivalry. Cannot achieve complete understanding of each other. Will tolerate each other moderately.

DRAGON – One of the best unions. Mutual love and understanding of each other. Very strong affinity in love and business relations. Prosperous and successful team.

SNAKE – No special degree of attraction. May have communication problems. The presence of mutual suspicions and inability to make concessions affect both sides.

HORSE – Acceptable and congenial union to a favourable extent. Will have practical need for each other only. No struggles for dominance.

SHEEP – Will not have strong need or understanding for one another. Cordial to relatively cool relations in marriage and business.

MONKEY – Could work together successfully as a team. Have areas of similar interest. Favourable to good relations in love and business. No strong rivalry.

ROOSTER – Will be able to communicate to a certain degree only. Will tolerate each other if mutual cooperation is required. Cool ties.

DOG – Mutual respect and friendly feelings for one another. Will cooperate to a good extent. No underlying animosities.

BOAR – Share common areas of interest. No difficulties in relating to each other. Fairly good relations in love and business. No large clashes.

The History of Hospital Food

Food within hospitals has for centuries played an important part in healing and recovery. Today, catering systems can be highly advanced mobile units which allow staff to prepare and feed patients right by their beds although this was not always the case.

In fact, however dubious the medical practices, in medieval Europe the value of was well understood by practitioners. Hospitals at this time were rarely operated by secular members of society and instead were the mainstay of the church, with many doctors doubling as clerics and many of the support staff being monks. It was these monks that usually prepared meals for patients.

In other parts of the world hospital food also played an important role, in some Islamic countries chroniclers speak of food which would have been suitable for nobles and kings. Many historians have argued that the high quality of care in the secular hospitals that were built in urban areas were a considerable achievement with medieval Islamic society.

Within Europe in later centuries the function of hospitals and those offering the care also changed. This was particularly the case in the eighteenth and nineteenth century where the monastery hospitals began to be replaced by more professional hospitals run by the military. Once again hospital food remained and important element within the recovery process although most hospital diets consisted of bread, beef and beer, although the serving of alcohol did diminish in the latter stages of this period.

Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries a greater understanding of the role that food played in healing was gained. Termed nutritional science hospitals now comprehended that there was a direct correlation between the food given to a patient and healing times and meals had to be carefully planned to ensure patients received all of the nutrients they needed.

Today hospital food is as important as ever although tight budgetary restraints and pressures on staff mean that hospitals are now looking for evermore advanced and efficient methods of food preparation which do not sacrifice taste, presentation or nutritional value.